06
Dec

David Attenborough is begging the world to curb plastic waste for ‘the future of humanity’

With the world currently enjoying season two of BBC’s epic series Blue Planet II, Sir David Attenborough is once again in the spotlight.

The legendary 91-year-old nature documentary filmmaker is now using his platform to call attention to the terrible problem of plastic waste that’s trashing the world’s oceans.

In an interview with Sky News, Attenborough said that the situation was “heartbreaking” and recounted the story of a young albatross he saw lying dead by its mother after it had choked on a plastic toothpick.

“I mean the albatross are such marvellous birds, you know?” Attenborough said, never wasting the opportunity to educate the world on what we’re quickly losing.

“They form partnerships for 50 years, they circle Antarctica collecting food, they come back to their mates in the same place but they also feed their young.”

“And what comes out of the mouth, of the beak of the adult?” he asked.

“Not sand eels, and not fish, and not squid, which is what they mostly eat. Plastic.”

Attenborough recently penned a Radio Times column in which he called attention to the eight million tonnes of plastic being dumped into the sea annually.

“Surely we have a responsibility to care for the planet on which we live?” he wrote.

“The future of humanity, and indeed of all life on Earth, now depends on us doing so.”

Attenborough also mentioned that he hoped U.S. President Donald Trump would reconsider the withdrawal of the U.S. from the Paris Agreement.

Changing Trump’s mind on climate change won’t be easy. The President has said that it is a hoax invented by the Chinese and that he cares more about Pittsburgh than Paris.

Even Elon Musk – who has built electric cars and is sending us to Mars – couldn’t convince Trump to rethink his views on the environment.

Trump may be keen to divorce Mother Nature, but many of us still love her.

Where else can we see cool stuff like an octopus choking a shark with its tentacles or iguanas being chased by snakes?

To learn more about plastic pollution in oceans and how you can make a difference, check out Plastic Oceans, a global non-profit that’s trying to solve the problem.